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Don't like flossing?

Posted On: January 10, 2017

BlogDon’t Like Flossing? Try One Of These Methods and Get Those Gums in Shape! 

When it comes to dental floss, what’s the best kind? Well, if you ask a dentist, they’ll tell you the best dental floss is the floss you’ll actually use. That could be Teflon floss, dental tape, nylon floss, waxed floss, and flosses with or without flavors – there are a lot of choices! There are also a number of ways to get your flossing done that don’t have you wrapping a long string of floss across your fingers and deftly maneuvering your hands in such an enclosed space. Enter floss, the oral irrigator, the vibrating flosser, and the dental pick! Which might be best for you?

  • Dental Pick:If you’re prone to ignore flossing, you may want to consider a good old fashioned dental pick. You’ve no doubt seen these before (sometimes cast aside on the sidewalk!) … they look like a plastic toothpick with a strand of dental floss strapped across a wide u-shaped tip. The simplicity and compact nature of these little portable floss “picks” seem to add to their convenience, and kids seem to love them when they’re first learning to floss. We also recommend using Soft-Picks with a flexible tapered bristles that fits between teeth.  It removes food between the teeth, stimulates and massage gums.  We’ll bet you can find at least one colleague in your office who has a few in their purse or desk for those moments when lunch lingers on the teeth a bit longer than appreciated!  “We’ll even give you a packet of these for free the next time you come in! 
  • Electric Flossers:Depending on the brand, electric flossers are known by a variety of names, and searching for these handy little devices can be somewhat maddening online (trust us!). You may be best just wandering into the drug store or supermarket to explore in person! There are vibrating flosserspower flossers, and air flossers. Picking the one that’s right for you depends on the task at hand. Power flossers and air flossers seem best if you’re dealing with space concerns near the gum line, and may be a good substitute for an interproximal toothbrush. A vibrating flosser, on the other hand, looks much like a dental pick and because of its design, can cover the entire length of the tooth. We recommend avoiding the use of these flossers buy using an electric toothbrush along with floss twice a day to keep your teeth clean and gums healthy.
  • Oral Irrigator:An oral irrigator is a device that uses a pulsating stream of water to remove plaque and food debris from between your teeth. There are a variety of instruments on the market, and your dentist can recommend one based on the health of your gum tissue and budget. Oral irrigators are remarkably effective at keeping gum tissue healthy, and have been shown to reduce pocket depth due to periodontitis. “Pocket depth,” refers to the depth of the gum tissue that immediately surrounds your teeth. You may not know it, but that’s what your dentist or hygienist is testing for when they’re poking that instrument in your mouth during an exam and 
  • It’s worth noting that each of these devices, while recommended, should be considered as supplements to normal flossing – still your best choice. But, if you have dexterity concerns, are purchasing something for a youngster, or just want to ensure your teeth are the cleanest they can be, these tool are great options!

 

  • Are you already our patient or looking to schedule your first appointment? Ask about our special for our patients. Mention this blog post and receive 10% off a Triumph Genius Electric Professional Toothbrush with Bluetooth Technology to make the job of brushing easy and fun.

 

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Electric vs Manual Toothbrushes

Posted On: October 01, 2018


Electric or Manual Toothbrush:  Which is better?

This is one of our most frequently asked questions!  Our answer?  It's not the brush that matters, it's who;s doing the brushing.

Let's break that down.  The goal of tooth brushing is to remove plaque from your teeth on a consistent(daily!) basis, so that we prevent the buildup of tartar which leads to tooth decay.  A manual toothbrush is a great and inexpensive tool that helps us do just that.  Make sure to brush two minutes per day, twice a day.  Gently brush ALL surfaces and make sure to reach those back molars.

For some people, it can be difficult to brush properly with a manual toothbrush.  Those with some form of motor disability or arthritis may benefit from using an electric toothbrush.  An electric brush can also be helpful for kids or anyone with braces.

The same tooth brushing rules apply-two times per day, two minutes at a time.  One advantage of an electric toothbrush is that some have a built-in-timer.  If you're one of those quick brushers who has a hard time making it to two minutes, consider using a timed electric brush.

At your next dental visit, ask us whether we think you could do better with a manual or electric brush!  And, as always, don't forget to floss!


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Blog- What's up with that poking?

Posted On: June 27, 2017

WHAT'S UP WITH ALL THAT POKING AT MY GUMS DURING MY CLEANING OR MAINTENANCE VISIT?

Have you ever wondered why your hygienist starts rattling off a series of numbers in the beginning of your recare visit? 2,2,3,4,5,7!  What's going on there?  What your hygienist is doing is checking the depth of gum tissue pockets that surround your tooth.  It's a proactive way to identify your risk for gum disease, and when done, regularly , can help catch it early. Dental probing is pretty interesting exercise in dentistry, can save you from surgery and extractions, and her's why.

DENTAL PROBING CATCHES PROBLEMS EARLY

One reason to visit the dentist regularly is to identify problems in your mouth that you are completely oblivious to.  Subtle changes in the health of our gums tissue can be missed by the naked eye, and some people-even those who visit a dentist regularly-can be prone to an excess buildup of plaque and tartar that can result in gingivitis and periodontal disease.  Thankfully, your dental team can catch these changes early through the use of X-rays and the practice of dental probing.  We do an annual probing on all adult patients.  This is done on the initial visit and once a year on your recare appointment.  

The reason for probing is straightforward.  As periodontal disease progresses, the visible markers of the disease (plaque and tartar) migrate down along the side of the tooth into the natural "pocket" between the ridge of the gum line and the tooth's enamel.  This inflames the gum tissue and widens this naturally slim gap between the tooth and gum.  As this gap becomes wider, even more bacteria are allowed access to the sensitive tissue fibers along the root's outer surface, casing more damage.  

One part of your treatment might be placing Arestin® , an antibiotic made especially for use in the gum pocket.  When placed in a periodontal pocket, Arestin®  maintains a high-level of antibiotic right at the gum disease site without exposing the rest of the body to antibiotics.  This allows treatment using one-hundredth the usual pill-form dose.  It directly fights the gum disease infection for 14 days

If not addressed, it may result in further bone loss, and the need to extract a tooth.  This is why probing is so important.



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Don't like flossing?

Posted On: January 06, 2019

Don’t Like Flossing? Try One Of These Methods and Get Those Gums in Shape!

When it comes to dental floss, what’s the best kind? Well, if you ask a dentist, they’ll tell you the best dental floss is the floss you’ll actually use. That could be Teflon floss, dental tape, nylon floss, waxed floss, and flosses with or without flavors – there are a lot of choices! There are also a number of ways to get your flossing done that don’t have you wrapping a long string of floss across your fingers and deftly maneuvering your hands in such an enclosed space. Enter floss, the oral irrigator, the vibrating flosser, and the dental pick! Which might be best for you?

  • Dental Pick:If you’re prone to ignore flossing, you may want to consider a good old fashioned dental pick. You’ve no doubt seen these before (sometimes cast aside on the sidewalk!) … they look like a plastic toothpick with a strand of dental floss strapped across a wide u-shaped tip. The simplicity and compact nature of these little portable floss “picks” seem to add to their convenience, and kids seem to love them when they’re first learning to floss. We also recommend using Soft-Picks with a flexible tapered bristles that fits between teeth.  It removes food between the teeth, stimulates and massage gums.  We’ll bet you can find at least one colleague in your office who has a few in their purse or desk for those moments when lunch lingers on the teeth a bit longer than appreciated! We’ll even give you a packet of these for free the next time you come in!”
  •  Electric Flossers: Depending on the brand, electric flossers are known by a variety of names, and searching for these handy little devices can be somewhat maddening online (trust us!). You may be best just wandering into the drug store or supermarket to explore in person! There are vibrating flosserspower flossers, and air flossers. Picking the one that’s right for you depends on the task at hand. Power flossers and air flossers seem best if you’re dealing with space concerns near the gum line, and may be a good substitute for an interproximal toothbrush. A vibrating flosser, on the other hand, looks much like a dental pick and because of its design, can cover the entire length of the tooth. We recommend avoiding the use of these flossers buy using an electric toothbrush along with floss twice a day to keep your teeth clean and gums healthy.
  • Oral Irrigator:An oral irrigator is a device that uses a pulsating stream of water to remove plaque and food debris from between your teeth. There are a variety of instruments on the market, and your dentist can recommend one based on the health of your gum tissue and budget. Oral irrigators are remarkably effective at keeping gum tissue healthy, and have been shown to reduce pocket depth due to periodontitis. “Pocket depth,” refers to the depth of the gum tissue that immediately surrounds your teeth. You may not know it, but that’s what your dentist or hygienist is testing for when they’re poking that instrument in your mouth during an exam.
  • It’s worth noting that each of these devices, while recommended, should be considered as supplements to normal flossing – still your best choice. But, if you have dexterity concerns, are purchasing something for a youngster, or just want to ensure your teeth are the cleanest they can be, these tool are great options!
  • Are you already our patient or looking to schedule your first appointment? Ask about our special for our patients. Mention this blog post and receive 10% off a Triumph Genius Electric Professional Toothbrush to make the job of brushing easy and fun.
  • CALL NOW AND RESERVE YOUR RECARE APPOINTMENT, 352-3307-3006.
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ADA recommendation for tooth brush care.

Posted On: March 29, 2017

BlogADA Recommendations for Toothbrush Care: Cleaning, Storing and Replacement

            

Tooth bushing plays an important everyday role for personal oral hyygiene and effective plaque removal.  Appropriate toothbrush care and maintenance are also importrant considertions for sound oral hygiene.  The ADA recommends that consumers replace toothbrushes approximately every 3-4 months or sooner if the bristles become frayed with use.

In recent years, scientists have studied whether toothbrushes may harbor microorganisms that could cause oral and/or systemic infection.1-4 We know that the oral cavity is home to hundreds of different types of microorganisms;5 therefore, it is not surprising that some of these microorganisms are transferred to a toothbrush during use. It may also be possible for microorganisms that are present in the environment where the toothbrush is stored to establish themselves on the brush. Toothbrushes may even have bacteria on them right out of the box4 since they are not required to be sold in a sterile package.

The human body is constantly exposed to potentially harmful microbes.  However, the body is normally able to defend itself against infections through a comination of passive and active mechanisms.  Intact skin and mucous membranes function as a passive barrier to bacteria and other organisms.  When these varriers are challenged or breached, active mechanisms such as enzymes, digestive acids, tear, white blood cells ad antibodies come into play to protect the body from disease.

Although studies have shown that various microorganisms can grow on toothbrushes after use, and other studies have examined various methods to reduce the level of these bacteria,6-10 there is insufficient clinical evidence to support that bacterial growth on toothbrushes will lead to specific adverse oral or systemic health effects.

Baylee Dental General Recommendations for Toothbrush Care 

The ADA and the Council on Scientific Affairs provide the following toothbrush care recommendations:

  • Please do not share toothbrushes. Sharing a toothbrush could result in an exchange of body fluids and/or microorganisms between the users of the toothbrush, placing the individuals involved at an increased risk for infections. This practice could be a particular concern for persons with compromised immune systems or existing infectious diseases.
  • Thoroughly rinse toothbrushes with tap water after brushing to remove any remaining toothpaste and debris. Store the brush in an upright position if possible and allow the toothbrush to air-dry until used again. If more than one brush is stored in the same holder or area, keep the brushes separated to prevent cross-contamination.
  • Do not routinely cover toothbrushes or store them in closed containers. A moist environment such as a closed container is more conducive to the growth of microorganisms than the open air.  Choose one with ventilation holes to help the brush dry.
  • Replace toothbrushes at least every 3–4 months. The bristles become frayed and worn with use and cleaning effectiveness will decrease.11 Toothbrushes will wear out more rapidly depending on factors unique to each patient. Check brushes often for this type of wear and replace them more frequently if needed. Children’s toothbrushes often need replacing more frequently than adult brushes.

Additional Comments 

Cleaning methods beyond those outlined above are not supported by the currently available clinical evidence. While there is evidence of bacterial growth on toothbrushes, there is no clinical evidence that soaking a toothbrush in an antibacterial mouth rinse or using a commercially-available toothbrush sanitizer has any positive or negative effect on oral or systemic health. Some toothbrush cleaning methods, including use of a dishwasher or microwave oven, could damage the brush. Manufacturers may not have designed their products to withstand these conditions. The cleaning effectiveness of the brush might be decreased if it is damaged.

Although there is insufficient clinical evidence to support that bacterial growth on toothbrushes will lead to specific adverse oral or systemic health effects, a common-sense approach is recommended for situations where patients may be at higher risk to infection or re-infection by various microbes. Examples may include situations where a patient or family member:

  • Has a systemic disease that may be transmissible by blood or saliva;
  • Has a compromised immune system or low resistance to infection due to disease, chemotherapy, radiation treatment, etc.

Common-sense supports that for patients who are more susceptible to infections, a higher level of vigilance to prevent exposure to disease-causing organisms may offer some benefit.

  • Replacing toothbrushes more often than every 3–4 months may decrease the number of bacteria to which patients are exposed;
  • Rinsing with an antibacterial mouth rinse before brushing may prevent or decrease how rapidly bacteria build up on toothbrushes;2
  • Soaking toothbrushes in an antibacterial mouth rinse after use has also been studied and may decrease the level of bacteria that grow on toothbrushes;6
  • Disposable toothbrushes might also be considered as an option, however cost may be a consideration with long-term use.
  • There are several commercially available toothbrush sanitizers on the market. Although data do not demonstrate that they provide a specific health benefit, if a consumer chooses to use one of these devices, the Council recommends that they select a product cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Products cleared by the FDA are required to provide data to the Agency to substantiate cleared claims. Examples of claims that have been cleared by the FDA for these products include:
    • Product “X” is designed to sanitize manual toothbrushes (To “sanitize” normally means that bacteria are reduced by 99.9 percent. For example, if one million bacteria are present at the outset, 1000 bacteria remain after a 99.9 percent reduction. “Sterilized”, on the other hand, indicates that all living organisms have been destroyed or inactivated. No commercially-available toothbrush cleaning products have been shown to sterilize toothbrushes);
    • Product “Y” is intended for use in reducing bacterial contamination that naturally accrues on toothbrushes

Claims that go beyond sanitizing the toothbrush or reducing bacterial contamination should be viewed critically by the consumer.

Consumers that choose to use these cleaning devices should inspect the brush regulary for wear and consider replacement more often if necessary

The Council will continue to monitor and provide information on toothbrush care consistent with current scientific information.

Council on Scientific Affairs, November 2011

References

1. Svanberg M. Contamination of toothpaste and toothbrush by Streptococcus mutans. Scand J Dent Res. 1978 Sep;86(5):412-4.

2. Verran J, Leahy-Gilmartin AA. Investigations into the microbial contamination of toothbrushes. Microbios. 1996;85(345):231-8.

3. Kozai K, Iwai T, Miura K. Residual contamination of toothbrushes by microorganisms. ASDC J Dent Child. 1989 May-Jun;56(3):201-4.
4. Glass RT, Lare MM. Toothbrush contamination: a potential health risk? Quintessence Int. 1986 Jan;17(1):39-42.
5. Kazor CE et al. Diversity of bacterial populations on the tongue dorsa of patients with halitosis and healthy patients. J Clin Microbiol. 2003;41(2):558-63.
6. Caudry SD, Klitorinos A, Chan EC. Contaminated toothbrushes and their disinfection. J Can Dent Assoc. 1995 Jun;61(6):511-6.
7. Warren DP et al. The effects of toothpastes on the residual microbial contamination of toothbrushes. J Am Dent Assoc. 2001 Sep;132(9):1241-5.
8. Quirynen M et al. Can toothpaste or a toothbrush with antibacterial tufts prevent toothbrush contamination? J Periodontol. 2003 Mar;74(3):312-22.
9. Neal PR, Rippin JW. The efficacy of a toothbrush disinfectant spray—an in vitro study. J Dent. 2003;31:153-7.
10. Goldschmidt MC et al. Effects of an antimicrobial additive to toothbrushes on residual periodontal pathogens. J Clin Dent. 2004;15(3):66-70.
11. Glaze PM, Wade AB. Toothbrush age and wear as it relates to plaque control. J Clin Periodontol. 1986 Jan;13(1):52-6.



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Homemade Mouthwash Recipes

Posted On: March 01, 2018

5 homemade mouthwash recipes to improve oral and dental health.

By Sara Vincent/EmaxHealth

According to the CDC half of American adults have periodontal disease. The Oral health Foundation says that, preventive care and oral hygiene are the key to improve oral and dental health. So, these homemade mouthwash recipes to improve oral and dental health will do just that.

The 5 homemade mouthwash recipes to improve oral and dental health must include natural products that are easy to find, and have antibacterial and anti-inflammatory capacities.

1) Sage and salt mouthwash

Sage is on the top of the list of recipes to improve oral and dental health, because of its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties. Various sage preparations have been observed to effectively treat a variety oral and dental diseases.

Ingredients

Filtered Water
1 tsp of mineral Rich Salt
Organic sage leaves

Method - In a bottle put 6 sage leaves
Dissolve salt in 5 oz. of boiling water
after all is dissolved, pour boiling water inside  bottle
use daily after brushing your teeth, until mouthwash is finished or continue a little longer if your oral health still is not up to scratch.

2) Salt and baking soda

This mouthwash is also great for those who want to treat and cure viral respiratory issues (cold and flu) naturally.

Ingredients

1/2 spoon of Baking soda
1/2 spoon of salt
1 Cup of water

Method - Mix baking soda and salt with water and use it after brushing the teeth. Rinse your mouth well and you will see your teeth shining.

3) Herbal mouth wash ingredients 4 oz of peppermint and sage leaves plus Echinacea Angustifolia root
8-12 drops of mint extract
1 tsp of thyme
2 tsp of Myrrh gum extract
5-7 drops of eucalyptus oil

Method - Prepare a herbal infusion with the peppermint leaves, sage leaves and Echinacea Angustifolia, and then take a mason jar and pour all the ingredients together in it. Keep shaking strongly until blended well, and you are done.

3) Herbal mouth wash ingredients 4 oz. of peppermint and sage leaves plus Echinacea Angustifolia root
8-12 drops of mint extract
1 tsp of thyme
2 tsp of Myrrh gum extract
5-7 drops of eucalyptus oil

Method - Prepare a herbal infusion with the peppermint leaves, sage leaves and Echinacea Angustifolia, and then take a mason jar and pour all the ingredients together in it. Keep shaking strongly until blended well, and you are done.

4) Lemon juice and water-  Lemon is highly antibacterial, so it’s a great ingredient to control dental plaque.

Ingredients

1 glass of Warm water
1 lemon

Method -Take the lemon and squeeze it into 1 glass of warm water and rinse your mouth and then spit it out.

5) Apple cider vinegar mouthwash

Apple cider vinegar has been reported to be a natural teeth whitener and bad breath neutralizer. So, it will certainly improve your oral and dental health.

Ingredients

2 tsp apple cider vinegar
1 cup of salt
1-2 drops of Vanilla essential oil

Method - Mix and store in a jar. Swish your mouth with this solution!

It is important to note that a lot of homemade mouthwash recipes to improve oral and dental health may include salt, baking soda and or essential oils. This is because salt is a natural antibacterial, baking soda has been reported to whiten teeth naturally, and essential oils have antibacterial and anti - inflammatory properties, making them a powerful ingredient that can not only help to improve oral and dental health, but also treat fungal infections and even boost immunity.

Want more Health information? Visit EmaxHealth.


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